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Stable Angina

Angina Versus a Heart Attack

An episode of stable angina is not a heart attack, but it does mean that you have a greater chance of having a heart attack. The pain means that some of the heart muscle is not getting enough blood temporarily. A heart attack, on the other hand, occurs when the blood flow to a part of the heart is suddenly and permanently cut off, usually by a blood clot. This can lead to serious heart damage.
 
There are some serious symptoms that indicate you are having a heart attack. If you have any of these symptoms, call 911 immediately:
 
  • Pain or discomfort that is very bad, gets worse, and lasts longer than 20 minutes
  • Pain or discomfort along with weakness, feeling sick to your stomach, sweating, or fainting
  • Pain or discomfort that does not go away when you take angina medicine
  • Pain or discomfort that is worse than you have ever had before.
     

Can It Be Prevented?

Regardless of your age, background, or health status, you can lower your risk for angina -- and it doesn't have to be complicated. Protecting your heart can be as simple as taking a brisk walk, whipping up a good vegetable soup, or getting the support you need to maintain a healthy weight.
 
And the good news: Research shows that people can lower their heart disease and angina risk enormously (by as much as 82 percent) simply by adopting sensible health habits. It's never too late to start protecting your heart health. A recent study shows that among people ages 70 to 90, leading a healthy lifestyle reduces the chances of dying from heart disease by nearly two-thirds (see Angina Prevention).
 
Life After a Stent: 5 Realistic Ways to Take Charge of Your Health

Angina Pectoris

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