Heart Disease Articles A-Z

Preparing for Atherectomy - Recommending Beating Heart Bypass Surgery

This page contains links to eMedTV Heart Disease Articles containing information on subjects from Preparing for Atherectomy to Recommending Beating Heart Bypass Surgery. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
Favorite Articles
Descriptions of Articles
  • Preparing for Atherectomy
    In preparing for atherectomy, you should not drink or eat anything eight hours prior to the surgery. This eMedTV resource explains other things to consider before surgery, such as arranging a ride home after the procedure.
  • Preparing for Beating Heart Bypass Surgery
    This eMedTV segment discusses patient-doctor communication, transportation, and other things to consider when preparing for beating heart bypass surgery. It also briefly lists instructions you may be given prior to surgery, such as to stop smoking.
  • Preparing for Open Heart Surgery
    As described in this eMedTV article, preparing for open heart surgery involves talking to your doctor about your medical history, current medications, and any allergies you may have. This resource discusses how to prepare for open heart surgery.
  • Prevent a Heart Attack
    By knowing the risk factors for heart disease, you may be able to prevent a heart attack. This eMedTV resource provides detailed information you can use as part of a prevention plan, including information about risk factors and how to manage them.
  • Prevent Heart Disease
    Can heart disease be prevented? This eMedTV segment explores this topic, listing some of the factors known to reduce your risk, such as quitting smoking, getting more physical activity, and possibly taking medication.
  • Preventing Cardiovascular Disease
    Knowing your risk factors is the first step in preventing cardiovascular disease. This segment of the eMedTV library explores several actions you can take to reduce your risk, such as eating right, exercising, and not smoking.
  • Preventing Heart Attacks
    Knowing your risk factors for heart disease or heart attack is the first step in heart attack prevention. This eMedTV article describes actions to take when trying to avoid heart attacks, such as monitoring your health and making lifestyle changes.
  • Preventing Heart Disease
    This page of the eMedTV library explains the role of lifestyle changes (such as quitting smoking) in preventing heart disease. It also discusses how knowing your personal risk factors and making good health choices can prevent or minimize risk.
  • Prevention of Heart Disease
    Quitting smoking is one of the most effective ways of reducing your risk for heart disease. This eMedTV article gives a brief overview of heart disease prevention and includes a link to more detailed information.
  • Prinavil
    This eMedTV segment offers an overview of Prinivil, a medication prescribed to treat several conditions involving the heart and blood vessels. This page also covers some general precautions of the drug. Prinavil is a common misspelling of Prinivil.
  • Prinivil
    Prinivil is a prescription drug used to treat high blood pressure and congestive heart failure. This eMedTV page discusses others uses for the drug, explains how it works, and also includes a list of potential side effects and dosing information.
  • Prinivil Dosing
    Prinivil dosing guidelines vary based on age, the condition being treated, and more. This eMedTV page lists common doses for people with congestive heart failure, high blood pressure, and following a heart attack, as well as tips on taking the drug.
  • Prinivil Drug Interactions
    Lithium, diuretics, and NSAIDs are among the drugs that can potentially interact with Prinivil. This eMedTV page describes how these Prinivil drug interactions can decrease blood pressure too much and contribute to kidney damage, among other things.
  • Prinivil Medicine
    Available by prescription only, Prinivil is a medicine used for high blood pressure and other conditions. This eMedTV selection gives a brief overview of this drug, with helpful information on what to expect. A link to more details is also included.
  • Prinivil Precautions and Warnings
    This eMedTV segment discusses Prinivil precautions and warnings, such as people who should avoid the drug and possible side effects. For example, some people taking Prinivil may experience extreme low blood pressure or kidney damage.
  • Prinivil Side Effects
    Among the Prinivil side effects listed in this eMedTV article are common reactions, such as diarrhea and nausea; rare problems, such as hair loss and memory impairment; and side effects to report to your healthcare provider, such as itching or wheezing.
  • Prinivil Uses
    Prinivil uses include treating high blood pressure and congestive heart failure, among other conditions. This eMedTV page also explains how Prinivil can lower the risks that accompany long-term high blood pressure and describes off-label uses.
  • Prinovil
    This eMedTV page explains that Prinivil is used to treat several conditions of the heart and blood vessels. This page further describes Prinivil uses, explains how the drug works, and offers dosing tips. Prinovil is a common misspelling of Prinivil.
  • Prinvil
    As this eMedTV resource explains, a doctor may prescribe Prinivil to help treat conditions that affect the heart and blood vessels. This page also discusses some dosing guidelines and general precautions. Prinvil is a common misspelling of Prinivil.
  • Prinzemetal Angina
    This eMedTV Web page briefly describes Prinzmetal's angina, a rare type of heart disorder that occurs in young people. This condition is caused by reduced blood flow to the heart. Prinzemetal angina is a common misspelling of Prinzmetal's angina.
  • Prinzmetal
    Prinzmetal is a rare form of angina -- a heart condition that is commonly characterized by chest pain. This eMedTV article looks at the causes and symptoms of this condition (also called variant angina), as well as treatment options.
  • Prinzmetal Angina
    Prinzmetal's angina is a rare heart condition that typically occurs in younger people. This eMedTV article briefly describes the symptoms and treatment options for this condition. Prinzmetal angina is a common misspelling of Prinzmetal's angina.
  • Prinzmetal's (Variant) Angina
    Prinzmetal's (variant) angina is an uncommon form of the condition. As this eMedTV page explains, angina is a heart disorder that is often characterized by chest pain. This page discusses the causes, symptoms, and treatment options available.
  • Prinzmetal's Angina
    Prinzmetal's angina is the rarest type of angina and can occur in people without coronary heart disease. This eMedTV segment offers information on this type of angina, including its causes and possible treatment options.
  • Procardia
    Procardia is a prescription drug that is licensed to treat certain types of angina. This eMedTV resource takes an in-depth look at Procardia, providing information on how it works, its potential side effects, and tips on taking the medicine.
  • Procardia and Breastfeeding
    Procardia does pass through women's breast milk in low amounts. This part of the eMedTV site discusses the manufacturer's recommendation on taking Procardia and breastfeeding at the same time, and covers why some doctors may still prescribe the drug.
  • Procardia and Depression
    Depression appears to be a side effect of Procardia. This portion of the eMedTV library describes the possible connection between Procardia and depression, and explains what to do if depression becomes a problem while you are taking the medicine.
  • Procardia and Erectile Dysfunction
    There are several possible side effects of Procardia, and erectile dysfunction is one of them. This eMedTV page discusses how often sexual problems occur in people taking Procardia and explains what to do if this happens to you.
  • Procardia and Pregnancy
    As this eMedTV segment explains, it may not be safe to take Procardia during pregnancy. In animal studies, the drug was shown to increase the risk of miscarriages and birth defects. This article takes an in-depth look at using this drug during pregnancy.
  • Procardia Dosage
    The recommended starting Procardia dosage for treating angina is 10 mg three times daily. This part of the eMedTV Web site describes the factors that may affect your Procardia dosage and outlines some tips on when and how to take the medication.
  • Procardia Drug Information
    Are you looking for information about Procardia? This eMedTV selection takes a quick look at this calcium channel blocker, with information on specific conditions it can treat, how often it can be taken, and more. A link to more details is also included.
  • Procardia Drug Interactions
    Warfarin, St. John's wort, and grapefruit juice may cause potentially negative interactions with Procardia. This eMedTV resource explores other potential Procardia drug interactions and describes how these interactions may lead to problems.
  • Procardia Overdose
    Fainting, difficulty breathing, and dizziness are possible signs of a Procardia overdose. This eMedTV resource lists some of the symptoms that a person might experience after taking too much Procardia, as well as treatment options that are available.
  • Procardia Uses
    Procardia uses include treating stable and variant angina in adults. This portion of the eMedTV archives explains these uses in more detail and also outlines possible off-label Procardia uses, such as treating preterm labor and migraine headaches.
  • Procardia Warnings and Precautions
    Procardia can make chest pain worse or may even cause heart attacks. This portion of the eMedTV library offers other Procardia warnings and precautions, such as the safety of taking the medicine during pregnancy and who should not take the medicine.
  • Propafenone
    Propafenone is prescribed to treat certain types of irregular heart rates by stabilizing the heart rhythm. This eMedTV selection presents more details on this antiarrhythmia medicine, including specific uses, dosing instructions, side effects, and more.
  • Propafenone Dosage
    Your individual dose of propafenone will be based on medical issues you have and other factors. This eMedTV page lists several recommendations for taking this medication properly, including how often to take it and whether you need to take it with food.
  • Propafenone Dose
    When treating heart rhythm problems with propafenone, the initial dose is usually 150 mg every eight hours. This eMedTV article examines dosing guidelines for this prescription drug, including some specific amounts for adults and tips on taking it.
  • Propafenone Drug Information
    A healthcare provider may prescribe propafenone to treat certain types of irregular heart rhythms. This eMedTV segment features a brief overview on propafenone, with information on specific uses of this drug, possible side effects, and dosing tips.
  • Propafenone Drug Interactions
    There are a number of medications that may cause negative drug interactions with propafenone. This eMedTV page describes the problems that may occur and offers a link to a more detailed list of products that may not be safe to use with propafenone.
  • Propafenone Maximum Dose
    As explained in this eMedTV page, propafenone dosing guidelines will vary, depending on how you respond to the medicine and various other factors. This page also discusses the maximum propafenone dose and offers a link to more tips on taking this drug.
  • Propafenone Overdose
    Seek medical attention immediately if you believe you have overdosed on propafenone. This eMedTV article outlines some of the potentially serious problems that may occur if too much of this medication is taken and how symptoms might be treated.
  • Propafenone Side Effects
    As this part of the eMedTV Web site explains, clinical studies on propafenone have shown that the most common reactions to this medicine include an unusual taste, dizziness, and nausea. This article takes a closer look at other propafenone side effects.
  • Propafinone
    As this eMedTV segment explains, adults who have certain problems with their heart rate may benefit from propafenone. This page describes specific uses and lists potential side effects. Propafinone is a common misspelling of propafenone.
  • Propanolol
    This eMedTV page describes propranolol, a drug that treats several conditions related to the heart and blood vessels (like angina). This page also provides a link to more detailed information. Propanolol is a common misspelling of propranolol.
  • Propanolol Side Effects
    This eMedTV page lists common propranolol side effects, like insomnia and vomiting, as well as side effects that you should report to your doctor right away, like dizziness. Propanolol side effects is a common misspelling of propranolol side effects.
  • Propofenone
    Propafenone is a drug approved to treat certain types of irregular heart rates in adults. This eMedTV selection offers a brief overview of this prescription drug and provides a link to more details. Propofenone is a common misspelling of propafenone.
  • Propranalol
    This eMedTV page explains how propranolol works to treat several conditions involving the heart and blood vessels. This page further describes these uses and provides a link to more information. Propranalol is a common misspelling of propranolol.
  • Propranolol
    Propranolol is a prescription drug that treats several conditions related to the heart and blood vessels. This eMedTV resource describes the conditions it can treat, possible side effects, general dosing guidelines, and how the drug works.
  • Propranolol and Breastfeeding
    The Academy of Pediatrics considers propranolol safe for nursing women and their infants. This eMedTV article takes a closer look at propranolol and breastfeeding, including some of the potential problems that could occur in a nursing infant.
  • Propranolol Dosage
    This eMedTV page gives propranolol dosage information for numerous conditions (like high blood pressure) and tips on taking the medicine. For example, the dosage for improving angina symptoms ranges from 80 mg to 320 mg a day.
  • Propranolol Hydrochloride
    If you have high blood pressure, you may have heard about propranolol hydrochloride. This eMedTV Web resource takes a quick look at this beta blocker, with details on available forms and what else it can be used for.
  • Propranolol Side Effects
    Commonly reported propranolol side effects include nausea, diarrhea, and insomnia. This selection from the eMedTV library also discusses serious side effects, such as wheezing, itching, or chest pain, that require prompt medical care.
  • Ramipril
    Ramipril is mainly used for the treatment of high blood pressure and congestive heart failure. This part of the eMedTV Web site covers the effects of ramipril, possible side effects, and dosing information.
  • Ramipril Cough
    As this section of the eMedTV library explains, a cough is one of the most common side effects of ramipril. This page provides statistics on how often a ramipril cough occurs and how often people stop taking ramipril because of this side effect.
  • Ramipril Dosing
    The starting ramipril dose for people with high blood pressure is usually 2.5 mg daily. This eMedTV page also covers ramipril dosing for people who have had a heart attack and have heart failure symptoms -- and lists factors that can affect dosing.
  • Ramipril Drug Interactions
    This eMedTV article lists drugs that can potentially interact with ramipril (such as diuretics, NSAIDs, and lithium) and explains how these drug interactions can alter the way your body metabolizes the drugs and lower your blood pressure too much.
  • Ramipril Precautions and Warnings
    Among the ramipril precautions and warnings covered in this eMedTV article are potential drug interactions; the risk of allergic reactions, liver failure, or slow heart rate in some people taking the medicine; and people who shouldn't take it at all.
  • Ramipril Side Effects
    Dizziness, headache, and cough are a few common side effects of ramipril. This eMedTV Web page also lists rare side effects, like arthritis and constipation, and explains the importance of talking with your healthcare provider if such problems occur.
  • Ramipril Tablets
    This eMedTV article gives some basic information on ramipril tablets, which are mainly used to treat high blood pressure and congestive heart failure. This Web page also covers side effects and includes a link to more details.
  • Ramipril Uses
    As this eMedTV page explains, ramipril treats numerous conditions (including high blood pressure and heart failure following a heart attack). This page also covers off-label ramipril uses, such as treating kidney problems in people with scleroderma.
  • Ranexa
    Ranexa is available by prescription only and is approved to treat chronic angina (chest pain). This eMedTV resource explores this prescription drug in more detail, with information on how it works, potential side effects, and safety precautions.
  • Ranexa 1000 Mg
    As this eMedTV page discusses, a healthcare provider may recommend taking 1000 mg of Ranexa a day to help prevent angina (chest pain). This article explores the dosing guidelines for this medication and offers a link to more detailed information.
  • Ranexa 500 Mg
    As explained in this eMedTV resource, a healthcare provider may recommend taking Ranexa 500 mg twice daily for preventing angina (chest pain). This article examines some dosing instructions for this medication and offers a link to more information.
  • Ranexa and Breastfeeding
    This eMedTV resource takes an in-depth look at why it may not be safe for women to take Ranexa (ranolazine) while breastfeeding. This page explains if any research has been done on this topic and whether it is known if the drug passes through breast milk.
  • Ranexa and Pregnancy
    The FDA has classified Ranexa (ranolazine) as a pregnancy Category C drug. This eMedTV resource looks at the reasons why this drug may not be safe for pregnant women. It also covers the complications that occurred during animal studies.
  • Ranexa Dosage
    As this eMedTV Web page explains, taking Ranexa extended-release tablets twice daily can help control chronic angina (chest pain). This article outlines specific Ranexa dosing guidelines and offers suggestions on how to take the drug properly.
  • Ranexa Drug Interactions
    Using Cerebyx, grapefruit juice, or other products while taking Ranexa may lead to drug interactions. This eMedTV article examines the complications that may occur when Ranexa is combined with these and a number of other medications.
  • Ranexa Medication Information
    A healthcare provider may prescribe Ranexa to help control angina (chest pain) in adults. This eMedTV Web page contains more information on this medication, including why Ranexa may not be safe for some people, dosing tips, and potential side effects.
  • Ranexa Overdose
    As this selection from the eMedTV Web library explains, overdosing on Ranexa (ranolazine) may cause problems like double vision and unusual sensations. Other potential overdose symptoms and treatment options are described in this Web page.
  • Ranexa Side Affects
    If you are using Ranexa, you may develop side effects like headaches or nausea. This eMedTV page lists other common problems, as well as a few that are possibly serious. Ranexa side affects is a common misspelling of Ranexa side effects.
  • Ranexa Side Effects
    Some people who took Ranexa in clinical trials reported problems like constipation and headaches. This eMedTV Web page takes a closer look at some of the other possible Ranexa side effects, including a few complications that require treatment.
  • Ranexa Uses
    As this eMedTV segment explains, if you have chronic angina (chest pain), you may be able to prevent angina attacks by using Ranexa. This page examines this prescription drug, including details on how it works and why it is not approved for children.
  • Ranexa Warnings and Precautions
    Ranexa can cause liver problems in some people. Other warnings associated with Ranexa are described in this eMedTV resource, including safety precautions for people taking certain medications or those who have certain medical conditions.
  • Reasons for Bypass Surgery
    The main reason for bypass surgery is to improve the blood supply and delivery of oxygen to the heart. This eMedTV segment discusses the reasons for bypass surgery and explains what happens during the surgery.
  • Recommending a Cardiac Catheterization With Possible Angioplasty
    This clip explains why cardiac catheterization with possible angioplasty is recommended.
  • Recommending Beating Heart Bypass Surgery
    Surgeons recommending beating heart bypass surgery use a heart stabilizer, rather than a heart-lung machine. This eMedTV Web page describes this technology and lists its potential advantages, such as a shorter hospital stay.
Terms of Use
Advertise with Us
Contact Us
About eMedTV
Privacy Policy
Copyright © 2006-2014 Clinaero, Inc.
eMedTV serves only as an informational resource. This site does not dispense medical advice or advice of any kind. Site users seeking medical advice about their specific situation should consult with their own physician. Click Terms of Use for more information.