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Loss of Life With Atherectomy - Myocardial Ischemia

This page contains links to eMedTV Heart Disease Articles containing information on subjects from Loss of Life With Atherectomy to Myocardial Ischemia. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
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Descriptions of Articles
  • Loss of Life With Atherectomy
    In the last 25 years, the chances of loss of life with atherectomy have decreased, but it is still possible. This eMedTV segment discusses factors that can affect the likelihood of this occurring, such as having severe heart failure.
  • Loss of Life With Cardiac Catheterization
    A possible complication of some medical procedures is loss of life. With cardiac catheterization, as this eMedTV page explains, conditions such as severe heart failure or diabetes may increase the risk of such a serious, although rare, complication.
  • Low INR
    You may have an increased risk for a blood clot or stroke if your INR is too low. This eMedTV Web selection describes what the INR value means and why this test is performed in people taking a blood-thinning drug. A link to more details is also included.
  • Lung Problems After Bypass Surgery
    Lung problems after bypass surgery can range from pneumonia to bleeding to lung failure. This page of the eMedTV site explains who is at increased risk for developing these problems. This page also discusses treatment options for these lung problems.
  • Lung Problems After Off-Pump Bypass Surgery
    Lung problems after off-pump bypass surgery can require the use of a breathing machine. This eMedTV segment explores this and other treatments (such as tracheostomy), as well as possible lung complications that can develop with this type of surgery.
  • Major Angioplasty Complications
    This video clip discusses possible major complications.
  • Medication Risk With Beating Heart Bypass Surgery
    New drugs always pose a medication risk, with beating heart bypass surgery or any surgery. This eMedTV segment explains why patients must communicate with their healthcare team about any allergies they have to reduce this risk.
  • Medication Risk With Open Heart Surgery
    Allergic reaction to medication is one of the risks of open heart surgery. As this eMedTV page explains, it's important to talk with your doctor about your allergies and current medications in order to reduce medication risk with open heart surgery.
  • Metallic Taste and Propafenone
    This eMedTV segment explains that side effects are possible with propafenone, and a metallic taste is one of the most commonly reported reactions. This page describes how often this side effect occurs and what to do if you develop serious problems.
  • Metaprolol
    Metoprolol is a prescription drug used to treat high blood pressure, angina, and congestive heart failure. This eMedTV page covers other metoprolol uses and offers general warnings for this drug. Metaprolol is a common misspelling of metoprolol.
  • Metoprol
    Your doctor may prescribe metoprolol if you have angina, high blood pressure, or congestive heart failure. This eMedTV segment explains how metoprolol works and lists potential side effects of the drug. Metoprol is a common misspelling of metoprolol.
  • Metoprolo
    Metoprolol is used for treating conditions related to the heart and blood vessels, such as angina. This eMedTV article lists specific metoprolol uses and describes the different forms of this drug. Metoprolo is a common misspelling of metoprolol.
  • Metoprolol
    Metoprolol is a drug often used to treat angina, high blood pressure, and congestive heart failure. This eMedTV page covers other uses of the drug and includes more details on metoprolol's effects, potential side effects, and dosing information.
  • Metoprolol 100 mg Tablets
    If you have high blood pressure, your doctor may prescribe a starting dose of 100 mg metoprolol tablets. This eMedTV Web resource discusses some of the factors that may affect your metoprolol dosage and offers tips on using this medication.
  • Metoprolol 200 mg Tablets
    If you have high blood pressure or angina, a doctor may prescribe 200 mg metoprolol tablets. This page of the eMedTV Web library further discusses metoprolol dosing guidelines and explains some of the factors that may affect your dosage.
  • Metoprolol 25 mg Tablets
    As this eMedTV Web page explains, your doctor may prescribe 25 mg metoprolol tablets to treat certain heart and blood vessel conditions. This page also covers metoprolol dosing guidelines and describes factors that may affect your dose.
  • Metoprolol 50 mg Tablets
    If you have certain heart or blood vessel conditions, your doctor may prescribe 50 mg metoprolol tablets. This eMedTV Web segment offers some general metoprolol dosing guidelines for conditions such as angina and high blood pressure.
  • Metoprolol Alternatives
    If you have side effects or if metoprolol is not working for you, there are several alternatives available. This eMedTV Web resource provides a brief overview of several alternatives to metoprolol, such as other blood pressure medications.
  • Metoprolol and Breastfeeding
    As this eMedTV Web page explains, metoprolol passes through breast milk in small amounts. This resource offers more information on breastfeeding and metoprolol, including an explanation of the risks this drug may present to a nursing infant.
  • Metoprolol and Depression
    There are many possible side effects of metoprolol, and depression is one of the more common ones. This eMedTV segment discusses the likelihood of developing depression with this drug and lists possible symptoms of depression to look out for.
  • Metoprolol and Dry Eyes
    Certain side effects may occur with the use of metoprolol, but dry eyes is reported only rarely. This eMedTV Web page explains how often dry eyes are reported as a side effect of metoprolol and offers suggestions that may provide relief.
  • Metoprolol and Hair Loss
    There are many rare but possible side effects of metoprolol, and hair loss, as this eMedTV article explains, is reported in less than 1 percent of people. Based on the severity of your hair loss, your doctor may recommend treatment for the problem.
  • Metoprolol and Low Blood Sugar
    As this eMedTV resource explains, there are many possible side effects of metoprolol, and low blood sugar is a potential side effect that may lead to serious complications. This page discusses how to recognize some of the symptoms of low blood sugar.
  • Metoprolol and Pregnancy
    As this eMedTV segment explains, metoprolol is a pregnancy Category C medication, which means it may be prescribed if the benefits to the woman outweigh the risks to the fetus. This article also discusses results of studies on metoprolol and pregnancy.
  • Metoprolol and Weight Gain
    Side effects may develop with metoprolol, and weight gain is seen in less than 1 percent of people. This eMedTV page explains the possible dangers of developing rapid weight gain while taking the drug and offers tips to combat gradual weight gain.
  • Metoprolol Blood Pressure Medicine
    As a type of blood pressure medicine, metoprolol works by blocking certain receptors in the body. This eMedTV Web page further discusses metoprolol, including how the medication works and information on the effectiveness of this drug.
  • Metoprolol Dangers
    You may not be able to safely use metoprolol if you have certain medical conditions (such as diabetes). This eMedTV Web segment takes a closer look at other potential dangers to be aware of before starting treatment with metoprolol.
  • Metoprolol Dosing
    With immediate-release metoprolol, dosing for people with angina starts at 50 mg twice a day. This eMedTV page offers dosing guidelines for immediate-release and extended-release metoprolol when treating conditions related to the heart and blood vessels.
  • Metoprolol Drug Information
    Your healthcare provider may prescribe metoprolol if you have high blood pressure. This eMedTV segment features some basic drug information on metoprolol, including a list of its other uses. A link to more details is also provided.
  • Metoprolol for Anxiety
    Treating anxiety with metoprolol is considered an off-label use of the medication. This eMedTV Web article further discusses using this drug for anxiety symptoms, including information on how this medication may work to relieve anxiety.
  • Metoprolol for Chest Pain
    This eMedTV Web segment explains that when chest pain is treated with metoprolol, the medication works by lowering the heart rate and decreasing the workload on the heart. This article also describes the various effects of metoprolol on the body.
  • Metoprolol for Children
    As this eMedTV page explains, the extended-release form of metoprolol may help treat high blood pressure in children as young as six. This page further discusses children and metoprolol, including some possible off-label uses of the drug in young people.
  • Metoprolol Medication Information
    This eMedTV page offers information on metoprolol, a medication used for treating several conditions related to the heart and blood vessels. This page also explains why the drug may not be suitable for some people and lists possible side effects.
  • Metoprolol Oral
    As this eMedTV Web article discusses, oral metoprolol tablets may be prescribed to treat several conditions related to the heart and blood vessels. This page also describes how metoprolol works, possible side effects, and general dosing guidelines.
  • Metoprolol Overdose
    Signs of an overdose with metoprolol may include wheezing, fatigue, or a decrease in breathing. This page on the eMedTV Web site lists other possible symptoms of an overdose and describes the treatment options that are currently available.
  • Metoprolol Pills
    Available in pill form, metoprolol is a drug that is used to treat high blood pressure and other conditions. This eMedTV article covers how the medicine works, explains how it is taken, and also provides a link to more information.
  • Metoprolol Problems
    Some of the potential problems with metoprolol may include tiredness, dizziness, and diarrhea. This eMedTV Web segment describes other possible problems, including potentially serious side effects that require immediate medical attention.
  • Metoprolol Risks
    Some of the potential risks with using metoprolol may include tiredness, diarrhea, and dizziness. This eMedTV Web resource describes other risks with this drug, including potentially serious problems that may require immediate medical attention.
  • Metoprolol Sexual Side Effects
    This eMedTV segment explains that in clinical studies that looked at the side effects of metoprolol, sexual side effects were not a reported problem. This article takes a closer look at the possible link between sexual side effects and beta blockers.
  • Metoprolol Side Effects
    Tiredness, slow heart rate, and dizziness are some of the more common metoprolol side effects. This part of the eMedTV library lists other common side effects of the drug, side effects that are rare, and problems that require prompt medical attention.
  • Metoprolol Strengths
    Metoprolol is available in the form of immediate-release or extended-release tablets. This selection from the eMedTV Web library provides a detailed list of the various strengths of metoprolol that are currently available.
  • Metoprolol Tablets
    Available as a tablet, metoprolol is a drug prescribed to treat high blood pressure and other conditions. This eMedTV article takes a closer look at the different forms of this drug, including the different strengths that are available.
  • Metoprolol Warnings and Precautions
    Because metoprolol passes through breast milk, women should stop nursing while using it. This eMedTV segment lists other metoprolol warnings and precautions, including side effects to be aware of and those who should avoid the drug.
  • Metopropol
    Metoprolol is a prescription drug approved to treat hypertension, angina, and congestive heart failure. This eMedTV segment describes how metoprolol works and lists common side effects of the medicine. Metopropol is a common misspelling of metoprolol.
  • Metoprotol
    Metoprolol is a beta blocker used for treating high blood pressure, angina, and other conditions. This eMedTV page explores other metoprolol uses and explains how the drug works for these conditions. Metoprotol is a common misspelling of metoprolol.
  • Mexelitine
    Mexiletine is a medicine approved to treat certain types of irregular heart rhythms in adults. This eMedTV resource offers a brief overview of this prescription drug and provides a link to more details. Mexelitine is a common misspelling of mexiletine.
  • Mexiletine
    Mexiletine capsules are taken every 8 or 12 hours to help treat potentially dangerous heart rhythm problems. This eMedTV article presents more details on this antiarrhythmia drug, including specific uses, dosing instructions, side effects, and more.
  • Mexiletine and Heartburn
    This eMedTV Web page discusses how often heartburn occurred in people taking mexiletine during clinical studies of the drug. This article describes some of the other possible side effects of mexiletine and offers a link to more detailed information.
  • Mexiletine Brand Name
    As this eMedTV page explains, brand-name mexiletine is no longer produced. This page takes a closer look at why this is the case and lists the available strengths of generic mexiletine. It also links to more information on the generic products.
  • Mexiletine Dosage
    The specific starting dose of mexiletine will depend on other medical conditions you have and other factors. This eMedTV page offers specific dosing guidelines, lists some helpful treatment tips, and explains why you will start this drug in the hospital.
  • Mexiletine Drug Information
    Mexiletine is taken every 8 or 12 hours to treat potentially life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias. This eMedTV segment presents a brief overview on mexiletine, with information on what this drug is used for, how it works, side effects, and more.
  • Mexiletine Side Effects
    Nausea, headaches, and blurred vision are some of the common mexiletine side effects. This eMedTV page presents details on other possible reactions, with information on how frequent the problems occur and which ones require immediate medical care.
  • Mexilitine
    As this eMedTV article explains, people who have potentially dangerous heart rhythm problems may benefit from mexiletine. This page discusses what this drug is used for and lists potential side effects. Mexilitine is a common misspelling of mexiletine.
  • Minitran
    Minitran, a medicated skin patch, helps prevent chest pain caused by inadequate blood flow to the heart. This eMedTV segment gives a detailed overview of this drug, with information on how it works, how to use it, possible side effects, and more.
  • Minitran and Breastfeeding
    As explained in this part of the eMedTV site, it is unclear if Minitran (nitroglycerin patch) passes through breast milk. This article covers the safety of breastfeeding while using Minitran, including how a similar medication performed in nursing women.
  • Minitran and Pregnancy
    If you are pregnant or thinking of becoming pregnant, tell your healthcare provider before using Minitran. This eMedTV Web article takes an in-depth look at using this skin patch during pregnancy, including the results of animal studies on the topic.
  • Minitran Dosage
    Minitran is available in four strengths. As this part of the eMedTV Web site explains, your particular dose will depend mostly on how you respond to Minitran. This article offers more information on when and how to use this skin patch.
  • Minitran Drug Interactions
    This eMedTV Web page lists several drugs that can interact with Minitran, including alcohol, calcium channel blockers, and ergot medications. This segment also describes the potentially serious problems that can occur as a result.
  • Minitran Medication Information
    If you have angina (chest pain), you may benefit from Minitran, a skin patch that contains nitroglycerin. This eMedTV resource offers more information on this medication, including what to discuss with your healthcare provider before using Minitran.
  • Minitran Overdose
    Sweating, throbbing headache, and seizures are symptoms of a Minitran (nitroglycerin patch) overdose. This eMedTV page describes what can happen when you use too much of this angina medication, including treatment options that may be administered.
  • Minitran Side Effects
    Headache, low blood pressure, and lightheadedness are some of the common side effects of Minitran. This eMedTV selection offers a more comprehensive list of potential reactions, including serious side effects that require prompt medical care.
  • Minitran Uses
    As explained in this eMedTV article, Minitran relaxes the veins and arteries, which helps prevent episodes of angina (chest pain). This page takes a look at what Minitran is used for, with details on how it works and whether it can be used in children.
  • Minitran Warnings and Precautions
    This eMedTV article lists several warnings and precautions for Minitran, including why certain people are at risk for dangerously low blood pressure while using it. This article also explains what to discuss with your healthcare provider.
  • Minor Angioplasty Complications
    This video clip discusses possible minor complications.
  • Moving to the Cardiac Lab (Angioplasty)
    This multimedia clip describes what will happen when you are moved to the cardiac lab.
  • Moving to the Cardiac Lab for Angioplasty and Atherectomy
    This multimedia clip describes what will happen when you are moved to the cardiac lab.
  • Moving to the Intensive Care Unit (CABG)
    This video clip talks about moving to the intensive care unit after your surgery.
  • Moving to the Operating Room (CABG)
    This video clip talks about what you can expect as you are brought into the operating room.
  • Moving to the Recovery Room After Cardiac Catheterization
    This video clip describes what happens in the recovery room after cardiac catheterization.
  • Moving to the Recovery Room After Cardiac Catheterization With Angioplasty
    This video explains what will happen in the recovery room after the procedure is over.
  • Moving to the Recovery Room After Cardiac Catheterization With Atherectomy
    This video explains what will happen in the recovery room after the procedure is over.
  • Myocardial Ischemia
    Myocardial ischemia is a painful heart condition caused by lack of blood flow to the heart. This eMedTV Web page offers an in-depth look at the condition (also known as angina), including information on causes, treatment, and prevention methods.
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