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Expectations With Angioplasty - Generic Coumadin

This page contains links to eMedTV Heart Disease Articles containing information on subjects from Expectations With Angioplasty to Generic Coumadin. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
Favorite Articles
Descriptions of Articles
  • Expectations With Angioplasty
    Expectations with angioplasty often include relief of chest pain. This eMedTV article discusses the expected results of angioplasty and explains that arteries may not remain unblocked after the procedure.
  • Facts About Heart Disease
    This eMedTV page shares important facts about heart disease and provides links to more information. By arming yourself with this knowledge, you can make lifestyle choices that prevent heart disease or minimize its impact if you already have it.
  • Felodapine
    As this eMedTV page explains, felodipine is a prescription drug that can help to lower blood pressure by relaxing the blood vessels. This page offers a brief overview of dosing tips and side effects. Felodapine is a common misspelling of felodipine.
  • Felodipin
    Felodipine is a medication used for treating high blood pressure. This eMedTV resource offers a brief description of the drug and provides a link to more detailed information. Felodipin is a common misspelling of felodipine.
  • Felodipine
    Felodipine is a medicine that is prescribed for treating high blood pressure. This portion of the eMedTV archives explains how felodipine works, lists potential side effects of the drug, and offers information on when and how to take the medication.
  • Felodipine and Breastfeeding
    As this eMedTV page explains, no research has been done on felodipine (Plendil) and breastfeeding, so it is not known if the drug passes through breast milk. This page also explains why breastfeeding women are typically advised to avoid the drug.
  • Felodipine and Depression
    If you are treating high blood pressure with felodipine (Plendil), depression may occur. This eMedTV page discusses the possible link between felodipine and depression in more detail, and explains what your doctor may recommend if you are depressed.
  • Felodipine and Headaches
    Is there a connection between felodipine (Plendil) and headaches? This eMedTV page discusses the results of clinical studies on the medication, and explains what your doctor may recommend if you are taking felodipine and headaches become a problem.
  • Felodipine and Impotence
    In clinical trials on felodipine, impotence was reported in less than 2 percent of men taking the drug. This eMedTV page provides more information on felodipine and impotence, and explains what your healthcare provider may recommend.
  • Felodipine and Pregnancy
    It may not be safe to take felodipine (Plendil) during pregnancy. As this portion of the eMedTV Web site explains, animal studies on felodipine and pregnancy show that the medication caused birth defects when it was given to pregnant animals.
  • Felodipine Dosing
    For treating high blood pressure with felodipine, dosing typically starts at 5 mg once a day. This eMedTV Web page takes an in-depth look at felodipine dosing guidelines and provides a list of tips and precautions for taking the medication.
  • Felodipine Medication
    This eMedTV resource takes a look at felodipine, a medication used to help lower blood pressure. This segment explains how it works, lists possible side effects, and addresses a couple of safety concerns, with a link to even more information.
  • Felodipine Overdose
    An overdose on felodipine (Plendil) may cause fainting, dizziness, and heart palpitations. This portion of the eMedTV Web site lists other potential symptoms of a felodipine overdose and explains the possible treatment options that are available.
  • Felodipine Side Effects
    Headaches, flushing, and dizziness are some of the most common side effects of felodipine. This eMedTV article lists other common side effects, as well as potentially serious side effects that you should report to your healthcare provider right away.
  • Felodopine
    This eMedTV article explains that felodipine works to treat high blood pressure by relaxing the blood vessels. This page also covers some general dosing guidelines and lists possible overdose symptoms. Felodopine is a common misspelling of felodipine.
  • Felodpine
    Felodipine is a drug commonly used to relax the blood vessels and lower blood pressure. This eMedTV segment offers a brief overview of the drug, including dosing and possible side effects. Felodpine is a common misspelling of felodipine.
  • Felopidine
    Felodipine, a prescribed drug used to treat high blood pressure, works by relaxing the blood vessels. This eMedTV segment offers a brief overview of the drug and provides some general dosing guidelines. Felopidine is a common misspelling of felodipine.
  • Fenofibric Acid
    Fenofibric acid is a prescription drug approved for treating unhealthy cholesterol and triglyceride levels. This eMedTV segment describes the specific effects of this medicine, explains how it works, and offers dosing information.
  • Fenofibric Acid Dosage
    The standard dose of fenofibric acid for most people with high cholesterol is 135 mg once daily. This eMedTV page also explains how dosing works for the treatment of high triglycerides and offers tips and precautions for using the drug.
  • Fenofibric Acid Drug Information
    As this eMedTV segment explains, if you have unhealthy cholesterol or triglyceride levels, your doctor may recommend a drug called fenofibric acid. This article gives a brief description of this medicine, including information on how it works.
  • Fenoglide
    Fenoglide is a medication often prescribed to treat high triglycerides and unhealthy cholesterol levels. This eMedTV Web page describes how the drug works, offers dosing information, and lists some of the medicine's potential side effects.
  • Fenoglide and Breastfeeding
    According to the prescribing information for Fenoglide, nursing women should not take this drug. This eMedTV page offers more details on breastfeeding and Fenoglide, and explains why the drug may be unsafe for nursing mothers and their infants.
  • Fenoglide and Muscle Pain
    Muscle pain is an uncommon but potentially serious side effect of Fenoglide. This page from the eMedTV site further explores the link between muscle pain and Fenoglide, and explains how this side effect may be a sign of more serious muscle problems.
  • Fenoglide and Pregnancy
    It is still unclear whether it is safe for pregnant women to take Fenoglide. As this eMedTV page explains, animal studies suggest that the drug may not be safe (as it caused numerous problems in pregnant animals and their newborns).
  • Fenoglide Dosage
    The usual starting dosage of Fenoglide for treating high triglycerides is 40 to 120 mg once daily. This eMedTV page also offers dosing guidelines for high cholesterol treatment and explains how dosing works for people with kidney disease.
  • Fenoglide Drug Interactions
    Warfarin, cyclosporine, and statins are a few medicines that may cause drug interactions with Fenoglide. This eMedTV article lists other medications that may cause drug interactions and describes the effects of these interactions.
  • Fenoglide Medication Information
    Fenoglide is a fibrate drug used to treat high triglycerides and unhealthy cholesterol levels. This eMedTV page offers more information on this medicine, including how Fenoglide works and what to discuss with your healthcare provider before taking it.
  • Fenoglide Overdose
    It is not known what to expect from an overdose of Fenoglide. As this eMedTV resource explains, any of the usual side effects of this medication are possible. This article also describes various treatment options available for an overdose.
  • Fenoglide Side Effects
    Common side effects of Fenoglide may include runny or stuffy nose, abdominal pain, and headaches. This eMedTV resource provides a more complete list of possible side effects, including serious problems that require immediate medical attention.
  • Fenoglide Tablets
    Available as tablets, Fenoglide is a drug approved to treat unhealthy cholesterol or triglyceride levels. This eMedTV selection offers general information on when and how to take Fenoglide and describes how the medication works.
  • Fenoglide Uses
    Fenoglide is a medication that is used for the treatment of unhealthy cholesterol and triglyceride levels. This eMedTV page describes the specific effects of this medication, lists possible off-label uses of Fenoglide, and explains how the drug works.
  • Fenoglide Warnings and Precautions
    You should not take Fenoglide if you are breastfeeding. This eMedTV Web page offers more warnings and precautions for Fenoglide. Information on side effects and people who should avoid the medication are also listed in this article.
  • Finding a Cardiac Rehab Program
    Finding a cardiac rehab program that meets your needs is important for your recovery. This segment of the eMedTV website provides suggestions and a list of questions to ask as you go about the process of finding program in your area.
  • Fish Oil
    A supplement high in omega-3 fatty acids, fish oil can help reduce blood pressure and prevent blood clots. This eMedTV article offers an overview of fish oil, including information on its numerous benefits, possible side effects, and precautions.
  • Fish Oil and Breastfeeding
    This eMedTV page explains that although omega-3 fatty acids are beneficial when breastfeeding, fish oil may not be the best source of those acids. This page covers what a doctor may recommend if you are considering taking fish oil while breastfeeding.
  • Fish Oil and Heart Disease
    Fish oil, whether through diet or supplements, has benefits for people with risk factors for heart disease. This eMedTV page discusses treating heart disease with fish oil, including information about who might benefit from it and recommended amounts.
  • Fish Oil and Rheumatoid Arthritis
    Fish oil may help relieve many symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis, such as stiffness and joint pain. This eMedTV article further discusses the benefits of using fish oil for rheumatoid arthritis (RA), including details on the effectiveness of these uses.
  • Fish Oil Capsules
    This eMedTV page takes a look at the use of fish oil capsules as a dietary supplement. It explores the alleged benefits and reminds readers that there are precautions and warnings to keep in mind. There is also a link to a detailed article on the topic.
  • Fish Oil Dosage
    The recommended fish oil dosage will vary based on why you are using the supplements. This eMedTV segment provides some dosing guidelines for controlling heart disease and high triglycerides. Tips for taking fish oil are also included.
  • Fish Oil Drug Interactions
    This eMedTV page explains that aspirin, NSAIDs, and warfarin are some of the drugs that may interact with fish oil. Drug interactions with fish oil may cause potentially dangerous problems. This page lists other drugs that can interact with fish oil.
  • Fish Oil Overdose
    The symptoms of a fish oil overdose may include an upset stomach and internal bleeding. This portion of the eMedTV archives explains the factors that will affect the symptoms you experience and discusses the possible treatment options.
  • Fish Oil Side Affects
    Some of the most common side effects of fish oil include nausea, a fishy aftertaste, and indigestion. This eMedTV page also covers which side effects require prompt medical care. Fish oil side affects is a common misspelling of fish oil side effects.
  • Fish Oil Side Effects Information
    A fishy aftertaste, heartburn, and nausea are among the possible side effects of fish oil. This eMedTV Web page discusses these and other side effects, and explains which side effects may be more serious and require prompt medical attention.
  • Five Nonsurgical Interventional Procedures for Treating Coronary Blockages
    When people think of blocked arteries, they may automatically think "surgery." However, as this eMedTV article explains, nonsurgical treatment procedures are available. This segment takes a look at the five most popular ones, including possible risks.
  • Flaxeed Oil
    Flaxseed oil may help reduce inflammation and prevent blood platelets from sticking together. This eMedTV page explores other potential health benefits of flaxseed oil and discusses its effectiveness. Flaxeed oil is a common misspelling of flaxseed oil.
  • Flaxseed Oil
    Flaxseed oil is commonly used as a supplement to promote heart health. This page from the eMedTV archives describes how flaxseed oil works, explores the effectiveness of these products, and explains what you should know before trying the supplement.
  • Flaxseed Oil and Breastfeeding
    Not much research has been conducted on flaxseed oil and breastfeeding. As this eMedTV Web page explains, however, normal amounts of flaxseed oil are probably safe for use while breastfeeding. It is not known if higher doses are safe.
  • Flaxseed Oil Capsules
    This page of the eMedTV library explores the use of flaxseed oil capsules to improve heart health. This segment explains why this supplement may not be as beneficial as you think, offers a couple of safety concerns, and links to more information.
  • Flaxseed Oil Dosage
    Generally, a flaxseed oil "dosage" of one or two teaspoonfuls is recommended for a variety of uses. This eMedTV resource discusses reasonable flaxseed oil dosing guidelines and offers some safety precautions for using the product.
  • Flaxseed Oil Drug Interactions
    Warfarin, aspirin, and clopidogrel may cause drug interactions with flaxseed oil. This article on the eMedTV site describes the possible effects of flaxseed oil drug interactions and lists other products that may cause a negative interaction.
  • Flaxseed Oil Overdose
    A flaxseed oil overdose may increase your risk of bleeding. As this eMedTV page explains, you should watch for any signs of bleeding if you have taken a large dose of flaxseed oil. These signs include easy bruising, tarry stools, and vomiting blood.
  • Flaxseed Oil Safety
    It is important to know that flaxseed oil does not provide all the health benefits of flaxseed. This eMedTV page explains what else you should know before using flaxseed oil. Safety warnings and precautions for flaxseed oil are also included here.
  • Flaxseed Oil Side Effects
    Potential side effects of flaxseed oil include diarrhea and loose stools. As this eMedTV page explains, side effects usually occur when you consume too much flaxseed oil. Problems that are potentially dangerous are also listed in this article.
  • Flaxseedoil
    Flaxseed oil contains an omega-3 fatty acid and may be beneficial for heart health. This eMedTV page further covers the possible benefits of flaxseed oil. A link to more information is also included. Flaxseedoil is a common misspelling of flaxseed oil.
  • Flecainide
    Taking flecainide can help stabilize certain types of irregular heart rhythms. This part of the eMedTV Web site features more details on this antiarrhythmia medicine, including what it is prescribed for, dosing instructions, side effects, and more.
  • Flecainide 50 Mg
    As this eMedTV article explains, a healthcare provider may prescribe 50 mg of flecainide to prevent certain irregular heart rates. This resource takes a brief look at some dosing guidelines for this drug and offers a link to more detailed information.
  • Flecainide Acetate Information
    People who have problems with their heart rhythm may benefit from a medication called flecainide acetate. This eMedTV article contains more information, including potential side effects and why flecainide acetate may need to be started in the hospital.
  • Flecainide Dosage
    You may need to receive the first doses of flecainide in the hospital, where you can be carefully monitored. This eMedTV explains what to expect when taking this drug and includes a discussion on how your dosage is determined.
  • Flecainide Side Effects
    As discussed in this eMedTV page, clinical studies on flecainide have shown that common side effects include headaches, dizziness, and vision problems. This article lists other potential side effects and explains what to do if they occur.
  • Flecanide
    As this eMedTV Web page explains, people who have certain problems with their heart rate may benefit from flecainide. This page describes specific uses and lists potential side effects. Flecanide is a common misspelling of flecainide.
  • Flecanide Dosage
    Taking flecainide every 8 or 12 hours can help prevent certain heart rhythm problems. This eMedTV segment examines the factors that may affect your dosage and offers a link to more details. Flecanide dosage is a common misspelling of flecainide dosage.
  • Flecanide Side Effects
    Headaches, nausea, and dizziness are some of the most common side effects of flecainide. This eMedTV page lists other possible reactions that occurred during clinical trials. Flecanide side effects is a common misspelling of flecainide side effects.
  • Flecinide
    Flecainide is a drug approved to prevent certain types of irregular heart rates in adults. This eMedTV segment offers a brief overview of this prescription drug and provides a link to more details. Flecinide is a common misspelling of flecainide.
  • Flexseed Oil
    Flaxseed oil is a supplement commonly used to promote heart health. This segment of the eMedTV library provides a brief overview of the topic and includes a link to more detailed information. Flexseed oil is a common misspelling of flaxseed oil.
  • Food to Avoid While on Coumadin
    Many foods and beverages interact with Coumadin. As this eMedTV resource explains, while there is no specific food to avoid while on Coumadin, there are general dietary guidelines that you should follow to help ensure a safe treatment process.
  • Foods That Interact With Coumadin
    There are many different foods that interact with Coumadin. As this eMedTV article explains, this is one of the main downsides of this medication. While there is no specific Coumadin diet, there are general dietary guidelines that should be followed.
  • Function of a Normal Heart
    This video clips explains the heart.
  • Garelick
    As this eMedTV page explains, garlic may have several benefits, such as improving heart health and providing anticancer properties. This page also covers what to tell your doctor before using garlic medicinally. Garelick is a common misspelling of garlic.
  • Garlic
    Garlic is claimed to have several medicinal benefits, such as lowering blood pressure. This eMedTV Web page provides an overview of this supplement, including how it may treat several health conditions, possible side effects, and safety concerns.
  • Garlic and Breastfeeding
    This eMedTV page explains that if you are consuming a large amount of garlic and breastfeeding, you should know that the components of garlic pass through breast milk. The possible effects of consuming garlic while breastfeeding are also discussed.
  • Garlic and Pregnancy
    Pregnant women should probably not consume large amounts of garlic or garlic supplements. This eMedTV Web article explores garlic and pregnancy in more detail, explaining why it is generally recommended for pregnant women to avoid garlic supplements.
  • Garlic Dosage
    The recommended dosage of garlic will vary, depending on which product you use. This eMedTV article explains why there are no clearly established dosing guidelines for this product and describes how to choose a supplement that is right for you.
  • Garlic Drug Interactions
    Garlic may interact with certain medications, such as blood thinners, NSAIDs, or protease inhibitors. This eMedTV page lists other medications that may interact with garlic and describes how these garlic drug interactions can lead to complications.
  • Garlic Overdose
    It is not exactly known what to expect from an overdose on garlic. This article from the eMedTV Web site describes the factors that may affect a garlic overdose, such as how much was consumed, and discusses the possible treatment options.
  • Garlic Side Effects
    Heartburn, gas, and nausea are among the possible side effects of garlic. This eMedTV article explains that some side effects can also be more serious and may require medical attention. This page discusses these garlic side effects in more detail.
  • Garlic Supplements
    People take garlic supplements for many reasons, such as improved heart health. This page from the eMedTV Web site gives a brief overview of this product, with details on what to discuss with your healthcare provider.
  • Garlick
    Garlic supposedly helps treat or prevent several health conditions, such as certain cancers. This eMedTV Web page offers a brief description of garlic, including other benefits and safety precautions. Garlick is a common misspelling of garlic.
  • Garlik
    Garlic may help with certain health conditions, such as heart problems, some cancers, and blood clots. This eMedTV page offers a brief description of garlic, including safety concerns to be aware of. Garlik is a common misspelling of garlic.
  • General Anesthesia for Heart Bypass Surgery
    General anesthesia uses medications that put you into a deep sleep so that you are not aware of any pain, pressure, or movement. This video clip discusses general anesthesia in greater detail.
  • Generic Betapace
    Betapace (sotalol) is currently available in generic form. This article from the eMedTV library describes generic Betapace in more detail, including a list of the available strengths, and explains whether it is as good as the brand-name version.
  • Generic Brilinta
    As this eMedTV segment explains, Brilinta (ticagrelor) is not yet available in generic form. This article discusses when the patent is set to expire and explains the difference between a generic name and a generic version of a drug.
  • Generic Cardene
    Generic Cardene is available in two strengths -- nicardipine 20 mg and 30 mg capsules. This part of the eMedTV site explains that the FDA has assigned generic Cardene an "AB" rating, meaning generic Cardene is equivalent to the brand-name drug.
  • Generic Cardizem
    Generic Cardizem tablets are available in four strengths and are made by several different manufacturers. This eMedTV article describes generic Cardizem in more detail and explains whether the generic drug is equivalent to brand-name Cardizem.
  • Generic Coreg CR
    Coreg CR (carvedilol CR) is not available in generic form. This article found on the eMedTV Web site explains when generic Coreg CR products may become available and discusses the difference between a generic medication and its "generic name."
  • Generic Coumadin
    Most generic Coumadin products are sold under the name warfarin sodium. This eMedTV page describes these generic versions in more detail and discusses some of the safety concerns when switching between different warfarin products.
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