Heart Disease Channel
Topics
Medications
Quicklinks
Related Channels

Heart Disease Articles A-Z

Nadalol - Normal INR

This page contains links to eMedTV Heart Disease Articles containing information on subjects from Nadalol to Normal INR. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
Favorite Articles
Descriptions of Articles
  • Nadalol
    Nadolol is a prescription medicine approved to treat high blood pressure and angina. This eMedTV segment offers a brief overview of this drug and its uses, effects, and warnings. Nadalol is a common misspelling of nadolol.
  • Nadolol
    Nadolol is a beta blocker medication often prescribed for the treatment of high blood pressure and angina. This eMedTV resource explains how the drug works, describes the specific effects of this medicine, and lists some of its potential side effects.
  • Nadolol 20 mg Tablets
    Nadolol is available in three strengths; 20 mg nadolol tablets are the lowest strength. This page on the eMedTV site lists the other available strengths, describes how nadolol works, and explains what side effects may occur with this medication.
  • Nadolol 40 mg Tablets
    As this eMedTV page explains, nadolol is an oral medication that comes in three strengths, including 20 mg tablets, 40 mg tablets, and 80 mg tablets. This article also describes how nadolol works and explains how dosing works for this drug.
  • Nadolol 80 mg Tablets
    Of the three strengths available for this drug, 80 mg nadolol tablets are the highest strength. This eMedTV article lists the other available nadolol strengths, explains what this prescription medicine is used for, and describes how it works.
  • Nadolol and Breastfeeding
    Before taking nadolol, nursing women should first consult their doctors. This eMedTV resource contains more information on breastfeeding and nadolol, and describes the problems that may occur if a nursing infant is exposed to the drug.
  • Nadolol and Pregnancy
    As this eMedTV segment explains, animal studies on pregnancy and nadolol suggest that the drug may not be safe for pregnant women. This article explains what happened when the beta blocker medication was given to pregnant rabbits, rats, and hamsters.
  • Nadolol Dosage
    The usual starting dosage of nadolol for treating high blood pressure in most people is 40 mg once daily. This eMedTV article also provides dosing guidelines for the treatment of angina and offers tips and precautions for using this drug.
  • Nadolol Medication Information
    Nadolol is a prescription beta blocker medicine approved to treat angina and high blood pressure. This eMedTV resource includes more information on this medication and explains what you should discuss with your doctor before using nadolol.
  • Nadolol Oral
    An oral medication, nadolol is often prescribed for the treatment of angina and high blood pressure. This eMedTV segment explains what forms and strengths nadolol comes in, describes how the drug works, and lists some of its potential side effects.
  • Nadolol Overdose
    Taking too much nadolol may cause congestive heart failure, low blood sugar, and constriction of the airways. This eMedTV article describes other potential overdose effects and explains what steps may be taken to treat them.
  • Nadolol Side Effects
    Common side effects of nadolol include cold and numb fingers, dizziness, and fatigue. This eMedTV Web page also lists rare but possible side effects of the medicine, as well as potentially serious problems that require immediate medical attention.
  • Narrowed Coronary Artery
    This video clip talks about blocked coronary arteries and the problems they can cause.
  • Natural Approach to Heart Disease
    As explained in this eMedTV segment, a natural approach to heart disease often involves making lifestyle changes, such as quitting smoking, losing weight, adopting sensible eating habits, and exercising more.
  • Nicardipine SR
    A healthcare provider may prescribe nicardipine SR to treat high blood pressure. This page from the eMedTV archives explains how nicardipine SR works, lists potential side effects, and offers information on when and how to take the medicine.
  • Nicardipine SR Dosing
    Nicardipine SR dosing for the treatment of high blood pressure typically starts at 30 mg twice a day. This eMedTV segment offers other nicardipine SR dosage recommendations and includes a list of tips for when and how to take the medication.
  • Nicardipine SR Information
    If you have high blood pressure, you may have heard about nicardipine SR, a calcium channel blocker. This eMedTV Web resource offers some basic information on nicardipine SR, including what to discuss with your doctor before starting treatment.
  • Nifedical XL
    Nifedical XL is a prescription medicine used for treating chest pain and high blood pressure. This eMedTV article offers a detailed overview of Nifedical XL, including information on how the drug works, possible side effects, and dosing guidelines.
  • Nifedical XL and Depression
    Clinical studies have shown that less than 1 percent of people taking Nifedical XL develop depression. This eMedTV segment explores the link between Nifedical XL and depression, explaining why it is difficult to tell if the drug causes depression.
  • Nifedical XL and Dry Mouth
    In clinical studies of Nifedical XL, dry mouth was reported in 1 to 3 percent of people taking the drug. This eMedTV page lists things you can do if you develop a dry mouth while taking Nifedical XL, such as sipping water or sugarless drinks often.
  • Nifedical XL and Impotence
    As this eMedTV article explains, some men who take Nifedical XL may experience impotence. This resource covers the results of clinical studies of Nifedical XL and impotence, explaining how often impotence occurs and what to do if it becomes a problem.
  • Nifedical XL and Weight Gain
    Less than 1 percent of people taking Nifedical XL experience weight gain as a side effect. This eMedTV article lists some things you can do if you're on Nifedical XL and weight gain occurs (such as eating heart-healthy foods and exercising more).
  • Nifedical XL Dosage
    Typically, the starting Nifedical XL dosage is 30 mg to 60 mg, usually once daily. This portion of the eMedTV archives explains how the Nifedical XL dosage is determined and provides suggestions for when and how the medication is taken.
  • Nifedical XL Drug Information
    Are you looking for information about Nifedical XL? This part of the eMedTV site briefly explores this drug, including how to take it, what to discuss with your healthcare provider, and more. A link to more in-depth information is also provided.
  • Nifedical XL Drug Interactions
    Taking drugs like warfarin or digoxin along with Nifedical XL can lead to drug interactions. This eMedTV Web page outlines several other drugs that can cause Nifedical XL drug interactions and describes the problems that can occur.
  • Nifedical XL Side Effects
    Some common side effects of Nifedical XL include swelling, nausea, and fatigue. This portion of the eMedTV library lists other potential Nifedical XL side effects, including rare side effects and side effects that may need immediate medical care.
  • Nifedical XL Uses
    Nifedical XL uses include treating high blood pressure, stable angina, and variant angina in adults. This eMedTV page discusses these and other Nifedical XL uses, including "off-label" uses of the drug (such as treating preterm labor and migraines).
  • Nifedical XL Warnings and Precautions
    This eMedTV page explains that Nifedical XL should be used with caution in people who have congestive heart failure or esophageal strictures. This article discusses other Nifedical XL warnings and precautions, and explains who should avoid the drug.
  • Nitrastat
    Nitrostat is a medicine prescribed to relieve, and in some cases prevent, chest pain (angina). This eMedTV resource describes who may benefit from this medication, how it works, and potential side effects. Nitrastat is a common misspelling of Nitrostat.
  • Nitro Spray
    A doctor may prescribe nitroglycerin spray to relieve angina (chest pain). This eMedTV Web article describes what this medicine is used for and discusses some important dosing information. Nitro Spray is a common misspelling of nitroglycerin spray.
  • Nitro-Bid
    Nitro-Bid is a prescription medicine used to prevent attacks of angina (chest pain). This page of the eMedTV Web site provides an overview of this medication, including information on how it works, dosing guidelines, possible side effects, and more.
  • Nitro-Bid and Breastfeeding
    This eMedTV page explores Nitro-Bid (nitroglycerin ointment) and breastfeeding, explaining that it is unknown if this drug passes through breast milk. This page also describes problems this drug may cause in an infant and what the manufacturer recommends.
  • Nitro-Bid and Pregnancy
    It may not be safe for a pregnant woman to use Nitro-Bid (nitroglycerin ointment). This eMedTV resource discusses the results of animal studies on Nitro-Bid and pregnancy, and explains why the FDA has classified it as a Category C medication.
  • Nitro-Bid Dosage
    As this eMedTV page explains, the starting dose of Nitro-Bid is usually half an inch of the ointment applied in the morning and again six hours later. This page further discusses how often to apply the drug, and also offers some tips for those using it.
  • Nitro-Bid Drug Information
    This eMedTV resource discusses some basic information on Nitro-Bid, a drug used to prevent chest pain in people with coronary heart disease. This article also explains how this prescription medicine works, possible side effects, and safety precautions.
  • Nitro-Bid Drug Interactions
    Nitro-Bid can cause complications if it is combined with certain medications. This eMedTV Web selection provides a closer look at the products that may cause drug interactions with Nitro-Bid and describes the potentially serious problems that can occur.
  • Nitro-Bid Overdose
    Signs of a Nitro-Bid (nitroglycerin ointment) overdose can include things such as blue skin or seizures. This eMedTV page outlines other potentially serious problems that may occur and explains what to do if you think you've overdosed on Nitro-Bid.
  • Nitro-Bid Side Effects
    Common side effects of Nitro-Bid ointment may include headaches and dizziness. This article from the eMedTV Web site lists other reactions to Nitro-Bid that can occur, including potentially serious ones you should report to your healthcare provider.
  • Nitro-Bid Uses
    Nitro-Bid is licensed to treat episodes of chest pain caused by coronary heart disease. This eMedTV page takes an in-depth look at these and other Nitro-Bid uses, including the unapproved (off-label) uses to treat anal fissures and Raynaud's phenomenon.
  • Nitro-Bid Warnings and Precautions
    This selection from the eMedTV Web library provides several Nitro-Bid warnings and precautions, including possible side effects, allergic reactions, and drug interactions. This article also explains what to tell your doctor before using the ointment.
  • Nitro-Dur
    Nitro-Dur is a prescription skin patch used to help prevent chest pain. This eMedTV Web page offers a complete overview of this angina medicine, describing how it works, potential side effects, and tips on how to use this patch effectively.
  • Nitro-Dur and Breastfeeding
    It is unknown whether the active ingredient in Nitro-Dur (nitroglycerin patch) passes through breast milk. This eMedTV page explains what might occur in infants whose mothers use Nitro-Dur while breastfeeding and what the manufacturer recommends.
  • Nitro-Dur and Pregnancy
    It is not known if it is safe to use Nitro-Dur (nitroglycerin patch) during pregnancy. This eMedTV resource further discusses using this angina medication while pregnant and describes what happened when this drug was given to pregnant animals.
  • Nitro-Dur Application
    When using Nitro-Dur, apply the patch to a clean, hairless area once daily and wear it for 12 to 14 hours. This eMedTV resource describes more application recommendations for Nitro-Dur, including why it is important to not wear this patch for too long.
  • Nitro-Dur Dosage
    As this eMedTV segment explains, the initial Nitro-Dur dose for preventing angina attacks is one patch applied to the skin each day and worn for 12 to 14 hours. This article further discusses dosing guidelines and tips for using this medicated patch.
  • Nitro-Dur Drug Interactions
    Alcohol, ergot medications, and alteplase may cause drug interactions with Nitro-Dur. This eMedTV Web selection lists other substances that may cause negative reactions with the skin patch and describes the problems these interactions can cause.
  • Nitro-Dur Indications
    As this eMedTV article explains, approved uses (indications) of Nitro-Dur include preventing angina attacks in people with coronary artery disease. This Web page also discusses whether there are any off-label, or unapproved, uses for this patch.
  • Nitro-Dur Medication Information
    Nitro-Dur is a prescription skin patch used to prevent chest pain (angina). This selection from the eMedTV Web site provides more information on Nitro-Dur, explaining the medication's dosing guidelines, possible side effects, and safety precautions.
  • Nitro-Dur Overdose
    An overdose with Nitro-Dur (nitroglycerin patch) could lead to dangerously low blood pressure and death. This eMedTV Web resource describes other possible overdose effects and explains how a healthcare provider may treat the symptoms that occur.
  • Nitro-Dur Side Effects
    Some of the commonly reported side effects of Nitro-Dur include headaches, fainting, and lightheadedness. This eMedTV segment provides a detailed list of side effects and also explains which reactions are potentially serious and require medical care.
  • Nitro-Dur Uses
    Nitro-Dur is a medicated skin patch prescribed to prevent chest pain in people with coronary artery disease. This eMedTV resource takes an in-depth look at how this angina medicine works and discusses whether it is safe to use Nitro-Dur in children.
  • Nitro-Dur Warnings and Precautions
    If you have low blood pressure, let your doctor know before using Nitro-Dur. This eMedTV segment discusses what else your doctor needs to know about before you use Nitro-Dur, as well as important warnings and precautions you should be aware of.
  • Nitrodur
    Nitro-Dur is a skin patch prescribed to prevent chest pain (angina) in people with coronary artery disease. This eMedTV page describes how the drug works, potential side effects, and how to use the patch. Nitrodur is a common misspelling of Nitro-Dur.
  • Nitrodur Patch
    If you have chest pain due to coronary artery disease, you may benefit from Nitro-Dur. This eMedTV article describes how Nitro-Dur works and lists possible side effects of this patch. Nitrodur patch is a common misspelling of Nitro-Dur patch.
  • Nitroglycerin Lingual Spray
    Nitroglycerin spray is a prescribed medicine used to relieve attacks of chest pain (angina). This eMedTV article takes a look at how the lingual use of nitroglycerin spray (spraying it on or under the tongue) can help relieve chest pain.
  • Nitroglycerin Spray
    Available by prescription only, nitroglycerin spray may help treat or prevent chest pain. This eMedTV Web selection explains how this spray works to treat or prevent angina attacks, offers general dosing information, and describes potential side effects.
  • Nitroglycerin Spray Dosage
    When treating chest pain with nitroglycerin spray, use one spray on or under the tongue. This eMedTV Web page takes a closer look at dosing guidelines for nitroglycerin spray, including important tips for how to safely use this drug.
  • Nitroglycerin Spray Information
    This eMedTV page offers information on nitroglycerin spray, a drug prescribed to relieve attacks of chest pain. This page gives a brief overview of how the medicine works, dosing tips, and safety precautions. A link to more details is also included.
  • Nitroglycerin Spray Side Effects
    Headaches and dizziness are some of the possible nitroglycerin spray side effects. This eMedTV page takes an in-depth look at potential reactions to this medicine, including serious complications like sudden fainting or bluish-colored skin.
  • Nitrolingual
    Nitrolingual is a drug that can be used to both treat and prevent chest pain (angina). This eMedTV page provides a detailed overview of this product, with information on when and how to use it, possible side effects, and what to do in cases of overdose.
  • Nitrolingual and Breastfeeding
    This eMedTV resource explains that only vague information is available on Nitrolingual and breastfeeding because the drug is typically not prescribed to younger women. This page describes considerations to keep in mind if using this drug when nursing.
  • Nitrolingual and Pregnancy
    This eMedTV page explains that Nitrolingual might be safe for use during pregnancy, but it should only be prescribed if the benefits outweigh the risks. This segment discusses this topic in detail, with information on why it was given a Category C rating.
  • Nitrolingual Dosage
    Everyone receives the same Nitrolingual dosage, regardless of factors like age or weight. This page from the eMedTV library describes the dosing guidelines for this medication in detail, with helpful tips on ensuring the medication's effectiveness.
  • Nitrolingual Drug Interactions
    This page of the eMedTV Web site provides a list of the drugs that can interact with Nitrolingual, such as rosiglitazone and alteplase. It also explains the complications that may occur as a result and how these problems might be avoided.
  • Nitrolingual Liquid
    Available as a liquid, Nitrolingual comes in a pump bottle that allows you to spray it under the tongue. This eMedTV page presents a brief overview of this prescription angina medicine, with information on how to ensure the drug's effectiveness.
  • Nitrolingual Overdose
    If a person takes a Nitrolingual overdose, the effects can be quite serious. This page of the eMedTV library lists some of the possible effects, which range from heart palpitations to death, and describes the usual treatment options.
  • Nitrolingual Pumpspray
    People who have angina may benefit from treatment with Nitrolingual Pumpspray. This selection from the eMedTV library presents a brief overview of this medication, with details on when and how to take it and important information for your doctor.
  • Nitrolingual Side Effects
    This segment of the eMedTV Web site discusses the various Nitrolingual side effects. This includes common ones, such as headaches and sore throat, and potentially serious ones that may require prompt medical care, such as signs of an allergic reaction.
  • Nitrolingual Spray Information
    This segment of the eMedTV archives provides some basic information on Nitrolingual, a spray used to both treat and prevent angina. This article discusses what to discuss with your doctor before beginning treatment and includes a link to more details.
  • Nitrolingual Uses
    This eMedTV segment explains why Nitrolingual can be used to both treat and prevent angina attacks -- at least on a short-term basis. This page also explains how this medicine works and discusses its use in children, as well as off-label uses.
  • Nitrolingual Warnings and Precautions
    If you are taking a PDE5 inhibitor like Viagra, you cannot take Nitrolingual. Precautions and warnings, as this eMedTV resource explains, also apply to people with certain medical conditions and women who are pregnant or breastfeeding.
  • Nitrostat
    Nitrostat is a medicine prescribed to help relieve or prevent attacks of chest pain (angina). This eMedTV resource takes an in-depth look at this angina medication, with detailed information on dosing, possible side effects, how it works, and more.
  • Nitrostat and Breastfeeding
    It may not be safe for infants to breastfeed if the mother is using Nitrostat (nitroglycerin tablets). This eMedTV segment discusses this topic in more detail, including information on what the manufacturer recommends.
  • Nitrostat and Pregnancy
    As this eMedTV page explains, Nitrostat (nitroglycerin tablets) is a pregnancy Category C drug, meaning it may not be safe for pregnant women. This page explains why a doctor only prescribes this drug during pregnancy if the benefits outweigh the risks.
  • Nitrostat Dosage
    When relieving angina (chest pain) with Nitrostat, the dosing guidelines are the same for everyone. This eMedTV segment describes how to use Nitrostat tablets to help relieve or prevent angina attacks, and also explains when to seek medical care.
  • Nitrostat Drug Interactions
    Alcohol, blood pressure medications, and various other drugs may negatively react with Nitrostat. This eMedTV page offers a detailed list of drugs that may cause interactions with Nitrostat, and explains the complications that these reactions may cause.
  • Nitrostat Medication Information
    This eMedTV article presents some basic information on Nitrostat, a medication used to relieve, and in some cases prevent, chest pain in people with coronary heart disease. This page also explains how this prescription drug works.
  • Nitrostat Overdose
    Possible symptoms of an overdose of Nitrostat (nitroglycerin tablets) may include vomiting and seizures. This eMedTV Web selection describes other possible symptoms and discusses potential treatment options that are available in cases of an overdose.
  • Nitrostat Side Effects
    Potential side effects of Nitrostat may include fainting, headaches, and sweating. This eMedTV Web selection discusses other possible reactions to this angina medication, as well as serious side effects that should be reported to a doctor right away.
  • Nitrostat Uses
    As explained in this eMedTV article, Nitrostat is used to help relieve and prevent episodes of chest pain in adults. This Web page takes a closer look at how this medication works for relieving angina attacks associated with coronary artery disease.
  • Nitrostat Warnings and Precautions
    You may not be able to use Nitrostat if you have anemia, dehydration, or certain other medical problems. This eMedTV article provides more warnings and precautions for Nitrostat, including details on when this product must be avoided entirely.
  • No-Reflow and Atherectomy
    No-reflow is a possible complication of atherectomy in which blood flow in a coronary artery decreases. This eMedTV article explains the link between no-reflow and atherectomy, why it is dangerous, and different ways it may be treated.
  • Normal INR
    It is important for people taking a blood-thinning medication to have an INR within normal limits. This eMedTV segment explains what INR is, how it is measured, and why a value too high or too low could cause a stroke or uncontrolled bleeding.
Terms of Use
Advertise with Us
Contact Us
About eMedTV
Privacy Policy
Copyright © 2006-2017 Clinaero, Inc.
eMedTV serves only as an informational resource. This site does not dispense medical advice or advice of any kind. Site users seeking medical advice about their specific situation should consult with their own physician. Click Terms of Use for more information.