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The Day of Bypass Surgery - Vitamin C Dosage

This page contains links to eMedTV Heart Disease Articles containing information on subjects from The Day of Bypass Surgery to Vitamin C Dosage. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
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Descriptions of Articles
  • The Day of Bypass Surgery
    On the day of bypass surgery, you can expect to have an intravenous fluid line and a test called an EKG. This eMedTV segment describes the medications and tests that will be used on the day of your bypass surgery.
  • The Day of Cardiac Catheterization
    On the day of cardiac catheterization, you should bring a list of your current medications with you. This eMedTV page discusses precautionary steps that your doctor will take before the procedure, such as applying EKG patches and preparing an IV.
  • The Day of Off-Pump Bypass Surgery
    A patient is carefully monitored on the day of off-pump bypass surgery. This eMedTV segment describes standard equipment, such as EKGs and IVs, that are used during off-pump bypass surgery and things to expect when going in for the surgery.
  • The Essential Guide to Coronary Stents
    If you have a narrowed artery, your doctor may recommend a coronary stent to repair the blockage. This eMedTV segment tells you everything you need to know about coronary stents.
  • The Heart
    This video clips explains the heart.
  • Therapeutic INR
    People using a blood-thinning drug should usually have an INR value within the therapeutic range of 2 and 3. This eMedTV page takes a closer look at what the INR test is used for and how it may help prevent a stroke or dangerous, uncontrollable bleeding.
  • Threading the Catheter
    Some people report feeling pressure when the doctor threads the catheter through the blood vessels. Usually this pressure is felt at the insertion site. While this technically isn't pain (since you'll be numb), it certainly isn't pleasant. It shouldn't be painful, though, so be sure to alert your doctor if it is.
  • Tiazac
    Tiazac is a medication that can treat high blood pressure and chest pain by relaxing the blood vessels. This eMedTV Web page explains how the drug works, describes possible side effects, and outlines some general precautions with the medication.
  • Tiazac and Breastfeeding
    Tiazac does pass through breast milk. However, as this eMedTV page explains, it is not known how the medication will affect a nursing infant. If you are taking Tiazac and breastfeeding or thinking of breastfeeding, make sure to talk to your doctor.
  • Tiazac and Depression
    For people taking Tiazac, depression may be a possible side effect. This eMedTV segment discusses how often depression occurs in people taking Tiazac and explains what your healthcare provider may recommend if you develop symptoms of depression.
  • Tiazac and Dry Mouth
    Certain side effects may occur with the use of Tiazac, and dry mouth is one of them. This eMedTV Web page explains how often a dry mouth is reported as a side effect of Tiazac and offers several suggestions that may help provide relief.
  • Tiazac and Impotence
    Up to 2 percent of men taking the highest dose of Tiazac for chest pain reported impotence as a problem. This eMedTV page discusses the results of other studies done on Tiazac and impotence in men taking the medication for high blood pressure.
  • Tiazac and Pregnancy
    It may not be safe to use Tiazac during pregnancy. This eMedTV page explains that Tiazac may increase the risk of miscarriages and birth defects when used during pregnancy. If you're taking Tiazac and pregnancy occurs, be sure to talk to your doctor.
  • Tiazac and Weight Gain
    This eMedTV page explains that side effects may occur with Tiazac, and weight gain appears to be one of them (occurring in less than 2 percent of people). This page covers what you should do if you are taking Tiazac and weight gain becomes a problem.
  • Tiazac Dosage
    The recommended starting Tiazac dosage for treating hypertension or chest pain is 120 mg to 240 mg a day. This eMedTV article also discusses maximum Tiazac dosing amounts and offers helpful tips for those taking the medication.
  • Tiazac Drug Information
    Tiazac is a prescription medicine used to treat high blood pressure and angina. This eMedTV resource provides some basic drug information on Tiazac, including side effects, safety warnings, and dosing guidelines.
  • Tiazac Drug Interactions
    Benzodiazepines and beta blockers are among the drugs that may negatively interact with Tiazac. This eMedTV segment provides a list of other medications that may cause Tiazac drug interactions and explains how these interactions can cause problems.
  • Tiazac Overdose
    People who take too much Tiazac may experience fainting, difficulty breathing, or fluid retention. This eMedTV segment outlines other possible symptoms of a Tiazac overdose, as well as various treatment options that are available.
  • Tiazac Side Effects
    Some of the most common side effects of Tiazac include dizziness, headaches, and indigestion. This eMedTV page lists several side effects of the drug, including common, rare, and serious side effects, as well as ones that need prompt medical care.
  • Tiazac Uses
    This eMedTV page takes an in-depth look at Tiazac uses, such as controlling high blood pressure and treating certain types of chest pain. This article also discusses possible off-label Tiazac uses, such as treating migraines and arrhythmias.
  • Tiazac Warnings and Precautions
    You should not take Tiazac if you have low blood pressure. This portion of the eMedTV archives highlights other important Tiazac warnings and precautions, including what to tell your healthcare provider before starting the medication.
  • Time in the Hospital After Your CABG
    This clip talks about what to expect in the hospital after your surgery.
  • Time of Day to Take Amlodipine
    There is no best time of day to take amlodipine, as long as you take it at the same time each day. This eMedTV article offers dosing guidelines for both adults and children, and includes more information on when and how to take amlodipine.
  • Time of Day to Take Metoprolol
    This eMedTV page takes a look at what time of day metoprolol should be taken. As this page discusses, metoprolol is typically taken once or twice a day and should be taken at the same time every day.
  • Tizac
    Tiazac is a drug that is prescribed to control high blood pressure or relieve chest pain. This eMedTV segment provides a brief overview of Tiazac, including its uses, side effects, and precautions. Tizac is a common misspelling of Tiazac.
  • Trandolapril
    A healthcare provider may prescribe trandolapril to treat high blood pressure and other conditions. This eMedTV article discusses how the medicine works, how and when to take it, side effects, drug interactions, and more.
  • Trandolapril Dosing
    As this eMedTV page explains, for treating high blood pressure, the starting trandolapril dosage is 1 mg or 2 mg daily and the final trandolapril dose is 2 mg to 4 mg daily. This page also lists trandolapril dosing tips (like how to take the tablets).
  • Trandolapril Medicine
    If you have high blood pressure, your healthcare provider may recommend a product called trandolapril. This eMedTV selection briefly describes trandolapril, with information on how the medicine is taken and what else it can be used for.
  • Trandolapril Uses
    Trandolapril uses may include improving survival after a heart attack and high blood pressure treatment. This eMedTV segment discusses these uses of trandolapril in more detail and explains how the medicine works to relax blood vessels.
  • Treatment for Angina
    Lifestyle changes and medication may be the only angina treatment a person needs. This eMedTV Web page briefly describes these options. It also explains how, if symptoms are more severe, surgery may be required to help treat the condition.
  • Treatment for Heart Disease
    For some people, heart disease treatment may only require lifestyle changes. This segment of the eMedTV library takes an in-depth look at these and other treatment options, including descriptions of angioplasty and open heart surgery.
  • Treatments for Cardiovascular Disease
    As this eMedTV selection explains, cardiovascular disease treatment may involve lifestyle changes, medications, and surgery. This article provides a brief list of cardiovascular disorders and the corresponding treatments for these conditions.
  • Treatments for Heart Disease
    As this eMedTV Web page explains, your healthcare provider may recommend lifestyle changes, medication, or other treatment options if you have heart disease. This article takes a quick look at the different forms of treatment.
  • Types of Angina
    The three types of angina have different causes, levels of severity, and treatments. This segment of the eMedTV Web site describes the different types (stable, unstable, and variant) and offers information on the causes and treatments for each.
  • Types of Blood Vessels
    This video describes the types of blood vessels and explains how they function in the body.
  • Understanding a Healthy Heart
    This interactive video segment explains in detail how a healthy heart works.
  • Understanding Blocked Coronary Arteries
    This video clip talks about blocked coronary arteries and the problems they can cause.
  • Understanding Coronary Artery Disease
    This interactive video discusses heart disease, including what causes it and possible symptoms.
  • Understanding Heart Disease
    This clip from eMedTV explains different types of heart disease.
  • Understanding How a Healthy Heart Works
    This interactive video segment explains in detail how a healthy heart works.
  • Unstable Angina
    Unstable angina generally occurs in older adults and can be a sign that a heart attack is about to happen. This eMedTV resource describes this type of angina in detail, including information on how it is associated with heart attacks.
  • Usual Flecainide Dosage
    This eMedTV article explains that when used for preventing heart rhythm problems, the usual dosage of flecainide is 50 mg to 100 mg, two or three times daily. This page also looks at how your specific dose is calculated and includes a link to learn more.
  • Variant Angina
    Variant angina occurs when there is a spasm in a coronary artery, which decreases blood flow to the heart. This eMedTV Web page takes a look at this condition and offers valuable information on when symptoms occur and how a diagnosis is made.
  • Verapamil
    Verapamil is a drug that is used for treating high blood pressure, chest pain, and irregular heart rhythms. This eMedTV segment offers information on verapamil and its uses, effects, dosing guidelines, and potential side effects.
  • Verapamil and Breastfeeding
    The manufacturer of verapamil does not recommend that women who are breastfeeding take verapamil. This eMedTV resource explains that the medication does pass through breast milk and describes what to do if you are taking verapamil and breastfeeding.
  • Verapamil and Dry Mouth
    It is possible to develop a dry mouth while taking verapamil. This eMedTV page offers more information on verapamil and dry mouth, including a list of suggestions for dry mouth relief and an explanation of what your doctor may recommend as treatment.
  • Verapamil and Hair Loss
    This eMedTV segment explains that clinical trials studying verapamil and hair loss have shown that hair loss was reported in less than 1 percent of people taking the drug. This page explains what to do if hair loss occurs while taking verapamil.
  • Verapamil and Impotence
    There are several possible side effects of verapamil, and impotence is one of them. This portion of the eMedTV archives tells you what you need to know about verapamil and impotence, including statistics on how frequently this side effect occurs.
  • Verapamil and Pregnancy
    Based on the results of animal studies, it may not be safe to take verapamil during pregnancy. This part of the eMedTV Web site looks at verapamil and pregnancy, including information on why the FDA classifies verapamil as a pregnancy Category C drug.
  • Verapamil Dosage
    There are several factors your healthcare provider will consider prior to prescribing verapamil. This part of the eMedTV library describes these factors in detail and also outlines some suggestions for when and how to take your verapamil dosage.
  • Verapamil Drug Interactions
    When certain medicines (such as aspirin or digoxin) are taken with verapamil, drug interactions may occur. This eMedTV page takes an in-depth look at other drugs that can interact with verapamil, and describes some of the problems that can occur.
  • Verapamil HCL
    Verapamil is a prescribed drug licensed to treat several conditions of the heart and blood vessels. This eMedTV page covers verapamil in more detail and offers general precautions for taking the drug. Verapamil HCL is a common variation of verapamil.
  • Verapamil Hydrochloride (HCl)
    Angina and high blood pressure are two conditions that can be treated with verapamil hydrochloride (HCl). This eMedTV Web page gives an overview of this prescription medication and lists some of the brand names under which it is sold.
  • Verapamil Overdose
    Drowsiness, confusion, and difficulty breathing are possible signs of a verapamil overdose. This eMedTV page gives an overview of the symptoms a person might experience after taking too much verapamil, as well as treatment options that are available.
  • Verapamil Uses
    As this eMedTV resource explains, verapamil is used for treating adults who have various conditions of the heart and blood vessels (such as high blood pressure and chest pain). This page also describes several off-label verapamil uses.
  • Verapamil Warnings and Precautions
    Verapamil should be used with caution in people who have CHF or liver disease. This eMedTV Web page offers other important verapamil warnings and precautions to be aware of prior to taking the drug, including who should not take the medication.
  • Verapimil
    Verapamil is a prescription drug that treats chest pain, high blood pressure, and irregular heart rhythms. This eMedTV page explains how verapamil works and describes factors that may affect your dosage. Verapimil is a common misspelling of verapamil.
  • Verapimil Dosage
    As this portion of the eMedTV archives explains, your verapamil dosage will be based on a number of factors, such as other existing medical conditions and the condition being treated. Verapimil dosage is a common misspelling of verapamil dosage.
  • Verapmil
    This eMedTV page gives an overview of verapamil, a drug used to treat several conditions of the heart and blood vessels. This resource describes how verapamil works and what to do if you overdose. Verapmil is a common misspelling of verapamil.
  • Vetemen C
    Many people take vitamin C supplements to treat or prevent the common cold. This eMedTV Web page explains what else vitamin C is used for, describes its effects, and lists side effects that may occur. Vetemen C is a common misspelling of vitamin C.
  • Viatmin C
    People often take vitamin C supplements to treat or prevent the common cold. This eMedTV segment explores the other possible benefits of vitamin C and offers information on how the vitamin works. Viatmin C is a common misspelling of vitamin C.
  • Vitaman C
    Vitamin C is commonly used for preventing and treating common cold symptoms. This eMedTV Web page explores other benefits of vitamin C and explains how the antioxidant works. Vitaman C is a common misspelling of vitamin C.
  • Vitamen C
    Vitamin C is used for numerous conditions, including the common cold. This eMedTV Web page briefly covers uses for the vitamin, describes its effects, and lists problems that may occur when taking it. Vitamen C is a common misspelling of vitamin C.
  • Vitamin C
    Many people take vitamin C to prevent or treat a cold. This eMedTV article provides an overview of vitamin C, describing the effects that it may have on the body and also discussing its safety and effectiveness.
  • Vitamin C and Breastfeeding
    Breastfeeding women tend to have a higher need for vitamin C. This portion of the eMedTV Web site contains more information about vitamin C and breastfeeding, and lists the recommended dietary allowance (RDA) of vitamin C for breastfeeding women.
  • Vitamin C and Pregnancy
    Women generally require a higher dose of vitamin C during pregnancy. This article from the eMedTV library offers a more in-depth look at this topic and discusses the potential risk of high-dose vitamin C supplementation.
  • Vitamin C and the Common Cold
    Many people believe they can prevent the common cold by taking vitamin C. This eMedTV article talks about the studies that have been conducted on this topic and discusses what can happen if you take too much vitamin C.
  • Vitamin C Dosage
    The recommended dose of vitamin C varies for different people. This page of the eMedTV site lists the recommended dietary allowance for this vitamin. Dosing guidelines for people who smoke and women who are pregnant or breastfeeding are also included.
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